Slip Into Our Genes: Analyzing Ancestry and Genetic Polymorphisms

Listen on Google Play MusicWe’ve both been big fans of Dr. Rhonda Patrick’s nutrition science podcast, Found My Fitness, for some time now. She’s insanely intelligent, and brings on guests from all spectrums of science. One of Dr. Patrick’s fascinations is genetics, and how specific variations within individual genes affect our disease risk and nutrient absorption and how that affects our healthspan, known as genetic polymorphisms. Of course, only about 20% of our general chronic disease risk is due to genes alone, and the other 80% or so is due to lifestyle (so things like diet, relationships, environment, and exercise). However, we believe it’s important to learn about and experiment on ourselves, and do whatever we possibly can to reduce the risk of dying from otherwise preventable means. And thrive as humans, maximizing our potential.

So, in true TFF fashion, we nerded out.

A few weeks ago, we each decided to take the basic 23andme ancestry test (pay $100, spit in a tube, send tube to lab for analysis) to sequence our genome. You can then take the raw genetic data and put it through a special software created by Dr. Patrick that looks at the various polymorphisms of relevance. We thought it would be a cool episode to discuss each of our results and what they mean, and just like we love to do, zoom in to zoom out. We discuss each of our ancestry data and the results of our genetic polymorphism testing in detail, and then have a more general conversation about how to interpret these findings.

We aren’t geneticists or doctors, and aren’t affiliated or sponsored by 23andMe or Dr. Patrick. We just think science is cool and learning about ourselves in a different way is also cool. Cool?

Hope you guys and gals enjoy the show!

-Jackson and Aaron

P.S: Here’s an interesting video from Dr. Patrick on this subject!


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Show Notes

23andMe

Dr. Rhonda Patrick’s software

 

Connect with TFF:
Website: tfflifestyle.com
Instagram: instagram.com/tfflifestyle
Facebook: facebook.com/tfflifestyle
Thought For Food Club: http://facebook.com/groups/tffclub
Twitter: twitter.com/tfflifestyle
Patreon: patreon.com/thoughtforfood
YouTube: bit.ly/tfftv
Podcast: bit.ly/TFFitunes

Music by: David Cutter Music – http://www.davidcuttermusic.com

What’s The Deal With Fasting?



Listen on Google Play MusicIntermittent fasting. Water fasting. Time restricted eating. Juice cleanses. Many of us have heard about these things, often knocking them as fads or extreme ways of living. However, there seems to be a lot of buzz lately about the benefits of fasting. So what does the science say? Well, you’re in the right place.

After hearing about the evidence behind time restricted feeding or intermittent fasting on Dr. Rhonda Patrick’s podcast and elsewhere, Aaron decided to try it out for himself. Alongside a regular sauna routine combined with an overall healthy, whole foods plant-based diet, he has seen profound benefits. From sleep quality to endurance gains, we’ve both felt the positive effects of eating our food within a 9 or 10 hour window during the day. But how does this actually work? What’s happening metabolically and physiologically to stimulate these effects? In true TFF What’s The Deal fashion, we set off to find out.

It’s been quite some time since we recorded a WTD episode, and that’s due to the immense amount of research and time it requires. With Aaron’s new kid on the block, changing jobs and moving, along with Jackson’s travel and school schedule, we simply didn’t have a ton of time to focus on this. But it’s definitely worth the wait; we covered everything from how fasting can potentially prevent disease at the cellular level, to how we feel it should be implemented in a practical fashion in everyday life. We zoom in to zoom out, and discuss this through an objective and evidence-based approach, so we hope you learn something new! It’s a bit of a longer episode, so hang in there, take a break if needed, and enjoy.

-Jackson and Aaron


Show Notes

Studies/resources referenced:

Found My Fitness (Dr. Rhonda Patrick): https://www.foundmyfitness.com/

Dr. Ray Cronise: http://hypothermics.com/home/

382 Day Fast:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2495396/pdf/postmedj00315-0056.pdf

 

Intermittent Fasting Meta Analysis:

http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/full/10.1146/annurev-nutr-071816-064634?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori%3Arid%3Acrossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3Dpubmed&

 

Circadian Biology:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12015613?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3946160/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5388543/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20228939?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19255424?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23899596?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24360271?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7985925?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23817841?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22811066?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17805428?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11405333?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19271347?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23899596?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24360271?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20228939?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12015613?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19255424?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7985925?dopt=Abstract

Gut Microbiota:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1528953?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20122134?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24009397?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21633181?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17183312?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25498959?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24009397?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21633181?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17183312?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27188904?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23847095?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22378797?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24687809?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22717075?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23159341?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21633181?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27208092?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25417104?dopt=Abstract

 

Modifiable Lifestyle Behaviors:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26411343?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26819200?dopt=Abstract

http://cel.webofknowledge.com/InboundService.do?mode=FullRecord&customersID=atyponcel&IsProductCode=Yes&product=CEL&Init=Yes&Func=Frame&action=retrieve&SrcApp=literatum&SrcAuth=atyponcel&SID=2BSZLrGIiYTKfgPpU7t&UT=WOS%3A000369691500017

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24950157?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24898236?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24918187?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21664632?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23199168?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24451608?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22608008?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27832862?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22608008?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27062219?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26864365?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24394729?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23945417?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20621406?dopt=Abstract

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/oby.20558/abstract;jsessionid=F5827D6CE2A9E32339B5CF3364DB56C2.f02t04

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19645960?dopt=Abstract

http://www.smrv-journal.com/article/S1087-0792(09)00072-0/fulltext

http://cel.webofknowledge.com/InboundService.do?mode=FullRecord&customersID=atyponcel&IsProductCode=Yes&product=CEL&Init=Yes&Func=Frame&action=retrieve&SrcApp=literatum&SrcAuth=atyponcel&SID=4EOY7NjjuEeUBDwdlOV&UT=WOS%3A000253823400020

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16227462?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21127246?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26864365?dopt=Abstract

 

Autophagy, Muscle Mass and Endurance:

http://genesdev.cshlp.org/content/21/22/2861.full

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24560926

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21030235

http://www.cell.com/abstract/S0092-8674(13)00645-4

http://www.cell.com/cell-stem-cell/abstract/S1934-5909(14)00151-9

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27032109

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26774472

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2402168

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25957282

http://jap.physiology.org/content/86/2/479.short

http://jap.physiology.org/content/110/1/236.short

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2990190/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27550719


Buy a TFF shirt! https://tfflifestyle.com/shop

Join the TFF Club on Facebook: http://facebook.com/groups/tffclub

Connect with TFF:
Website: tfflifestyle.com
Instagram: instagram.com/tfflifestyle
Facebook: facebook.com/tfflifestyle
Thought For Food Club: http://facebook.com/groups/tffclub
Twitter: twitter.com/tfflifestyle
Patreon: patreon.com/thoughtforfood
YouTube: bit.ly/tfftv
Podcast: bit.ly/TFFitunes

Music by: David Cutter Music – http://www.davidcuttermusic.com

Rip Esselstyn on Rescuing Your Health by Becoming Plant-Strong

 

Listen on Google Play MusicThis week on the podcast, we’re incredibly excited to share our conversation with plant-based legend, Rip Esselstyn. If you’re a veteran of the plant-based movement, you’ve most likely seen the acclaimed documentary Forks Over Knives, of which Rip plays an integral role. Rip is the son of legendary surgeon and luminary of the plant-based medical field, Caldwell Esselstyn. Rip has a background in elite triathlon, and was an All-American swimmer at UT Austin, and then shifting into the professional triathlon ranks, all while fueling himself on a whole food, plant-based diet. He then inspired his firefighting brothers to overhaul their diet to get healthier, which catalyzed the writing of his first book, The Engine 2 Diet. He has since partnered with Whole Foods on an exclusive line of healthy, plant-based products like hummus, plant milks, and more and has a brand new book out called the Seven Day Rescue Diet which we get into in the episode! 

Rip is a super energetic, passionate, and positive dude that is on a mission to help people rescue their health through plants, which is something we can certainly get behind. We talked about the Seven Pillars of the new book, how athletes should be fueling, and a bit of the behind the scenes of his business and employee seminar work with Whole Foods Market. We hope you enjoy the conversation!

Just want to give a big thanks to all of our recent Patreon supporters. You are the reason we are able to keep the podcast going, because even a small amount of funds coming in each month helps us have security in upgrading our equipment, making shirts, etc. We’re so grateful!

-Jackson and Aaron


Are you enjoying the podcast? You can support our free content by sharing it with friends and family if you feel like they could get something out of our message. It would also help us out a ton if you left a quick review on the iTunes store, it really helps the podcast grow and reach more listeners (and it only takes 5 min)! If you want to go above and beyond, you can kick us some change by pledging your support on Patreon each month, which is a recurring crowd funding site dedicated to creators like us! It allows us to keep putting out the free content that you’re used to, but helps us to invest more money into improving the quality of the show through better equipment (every penny we make on Patreon goes to bettering our setup to make the content better for you!). New shirts are LIVE! But (awesomely) we are nearly sold out. We have a limited run of a few sizes left, so go check them out! We will be making another order soon, so don’t worry!

If you haven’t already, be sure to subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or wherever you listen to podcasts to get the new episode right as it comes out. Also, subscribe our YouTube channel, Thought For Food TV.

We really appreciate all the support guys, so don’t forget to follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter so we can engage more with all of our awesome supporters. This is such a fun thing we’re doing, and it’s even cooler that we are having a meaningful impact on people’s lives. So thanks! If you have any questions for future Q&A episodes, drop us an email at tfflifestyle@gmail.com or by visiting the contact us page on the website.

Show Notes

Connect with Rip:

Engine 2 Diet: https://engine2diet.com/

On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Engine2Diet/

On Twitter: https://twitter.com/Engine2Diet

Book on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Engine-Seven-Day-Rescue-Diet-Plants/dp/1455591173/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1498065215&sr=8-1&keywords=seven+day+rescue+diet

Follow TFF:

Facebook.com/TFFlifestyle

Instagram: @tfflifestyle

YouTube Channel: Thought For Food TV

Support TFF: www.patreon.com/thoughtforfood

Twitter: @TFFlifestyle

Follow Jackson on Strava: https://www.strava.com/athletes/54401

Music by:

soundcloud.com/dcuttermusic

soundcloud.com/peterkuli

Exercise Addiction Update

Listen on Google Play Music

 

 

 

A while back on the show, we talked about our struggles with exercise addiction, a problem that is very common among athletes and health/fitness community. We shared our experiences with this topic, and tried to unpack how to better balance life with exercise. We recommend you go back and listen to that episode before diving into this one if you haven’t already. 

Today, we revisit this realm and check in with each other about where we’re at in terms of exercise addiction. We discuss what our respective routines look like now, the difference between training to maintain and training for a specific event (like Jackson’s upcoming Vegan Alpletic adventure), and finally some updated tips and advice for preventing and addressing this problem. We’ve seen this pop up a lot in people within the plant-based community, and have had a lot of you reach out with your concerns and experiences, which is really inspiring. We want to stimulate a conversation among athletes to hopefully find a better relationship with exercise and food and lifestyle, and it doesn’t end with us. So please reach out with any suggestions, comments, concerns, or whatever you feel would add to the conversation by shooting us an email to tfflifestyle@gmail.com.

Jackson is getting ready to leave for Europe this weekend, so definitely stay tuned to the YouTube channel for epic vlogs of his adventure, and don’t forget to support his Mercy For Animals Fundraiser! We also added a new Patreon reward tier where you can gain access to two exclusive and uncensored, unreleased Random Show episodes of the podcast by pledging $10 or more per month! Okay, enough from us. Enjoy the show!

-Jackson and Aaron


Are you enjoying the podcast? You can support our free content by sharing it with friends and family if you feel like they could get something out of our message. It would also help us out a ton if you left a quick review on the iTunes store, it really helps the podcast grow and reach more listeners (and it only takes 5 min)! If you want to go above and beyond, you can kick us some change by pledging your support on Patreon each month, which is a recurring crowd funding site dedicated to creators like us! It allows us to keep putting out the free content that you’re used to, but helps us to invest more money into improving the quality of the show through better equipment (every penny we make on Patreon goes to bettering our setup to make the content better for you!). New shirts are LIVE! But (awesomely) we are nearly sold out. We have a limited run of a few sizes left, so go check them out! We will be making another order soon, so don’t worry!

If you haven’t already, be sure to subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or wherever you listen to podcasts to get the new episode right as it comes out. Also, subscribe our YouTube channel, Thought For Food TV.

We really appreciate all the support guys, so don’t forget to follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter so we can engage more with all of our awesome supporters. This is such a fun thing we’re doing, and it’s even cooler that we are having a meaningful impact on people’s lives. So thanks! If you have any questions for future Q&A episodes, drop us an email at tfflifestyle@gmail.com or by visiting the contact us page on the website.

Show Notes

Our Experience With Exercise Addiction

Follow TFF:

Facebook.com/TFFlifestyle

Instagram: @tfflifestyle

YouTube Channel: Thought For Food TV

Support TFF: www.patreon.com/thoughtforfood

Twitter: @TFFlifestyle

Follow Jackson on Strava: https://www.strava.com/athletes/54401

Music by:

soundcloud.com/dcuttermusic

soundcloud.com/peterkuli

What’s the Deal With Carbs?

screen-shot-2017-01-10-at-7-46-40-am

The king of macronutrients. The most controversial word in all of nutrition. Builder of cities, destroyer of empires. Carbohydrates. In the fourth installment of our What’s the Deal series, we go hard and deep on all things carbs. With so much information and misinformation out there, we did what we do best and jumped on the science, the cold hard evidence, first defining this nutrient and its function and then address some of the major claims about carbohydrates such as:

  • carbohydrates make you fat
  • carbs cause inflammation
  • carbs from fruit are the same as table sugar
  • high-carb diets cause diabetes and cancer
  • and more!

We also discuss the role of carbohydrates for athletes, and then a more philosophical look at applying these concepts through a macro lens and why we should stop talking about carbs and protein and diet so extensively. Grab a notebook, take a glucose break, kick back and relax, and enjoy the show!

Go eat some plants!

-Jackson and Aaron


Thank you thank you thank you to everyone who has subscribed to the show on iTunes or wherever you consume podcasts, left a review on iTunes, shared the show with your friends and family, or given a nice comment on social media. This is such an easy and free way to support what we’re doing, yet is profound! We read each and every comment and review, so keep ’em coming!

If you want to go above and beyond, you can kick us some change by pledging your support on Patreon each month, which is a recurring crowd funding site dedicated to creators like us! It allows us to keep putting out the free content that you’re used to, but helps us to invest more money into improving the quality of the show through better equipment (every penny we make on Patreon goes to bettering our setup to make the content better for you!). You can also visit tfflifestyle.com/support to learn more and make a one-time donation.

Carbs?! What about PROTEIN?! Our new book, Dude, Where Do You Get Your Protein? is available now! Check it out at tfflifestyle.com/product/proteinbook and enjoy this amazing resource for everything there is to know about protein.

If you haven’t already, be sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel, Thought For Food TV, where we put up regular vlogs and other cool videos so you can get a behind the scenes look at TFF. It’s a lot of fun!

So much love for the support everyone, we seriously can’t thank you enough. We are coming up on a year doing this thing and have loved every minute of it, thanks to you. Keep spreading the inspiring message of healthy living, let’s create a paradigm shift together. Have an amazing rest of your week and thanks SO much for listening.


Show Notes

References:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15983191

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23509418

http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/82/2/421.full

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(12)61766-8/abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23933265

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20564476

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21621801

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24065788

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15143200

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18454136

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14693970

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17346204

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1394223/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC507380/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15523486

http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/84/5/1171.short

http://jn.nutrition.org/content/131/11/3109S.short

Follow TFF:

Facebook.com/TFFlifestyle

Instagram: @tfflifestyle

YouTube Channel: Thought For Food TV

Support TFF: www.patreon.com/thoughtforfood

Twitter: @TFFlifestyle

Follow Jackson on Strava: https://www.strava.com/athletes/54401

Interested in coaching from Jackson and Aaron? Send us an email at tfflifestyle@gmail.com or click services on the website to learn more.

Music by:

soundcloud.com/dcuttermusic

soundcloud.com/peterkuli

Our Goals for 2017

fullsizeoutput_537

2016 is nearly gone, and while it’s important to be present, we must look towards the new year and begin planning the next stage of our lives and TFF. 2017 is sure to be an exciting year for both of us, and for TFF. While we’re not the biggest fans of New Year’s Resolutions that aren’t realistic, we do have some pretty specific goals that we want to achieve in the new year. In today’s episode, we talk about:

  • our thoughts on new year’s resolutions and goals in general
  • each of our own personal goals for 2017
  • general goals for TFF

What are your thoughts? What do you think about resolutions? What are your goals for 2017? We’d love to hear. We couldn’t be more excited about the future and what 2017 holds, and are excited to share that with you. Hope you enjoy the episode, and see you next year!

-Jackson and Aaron


Do you get enough protein? Our new book, Dude, Where Do You Get Your Protein? is available now! Check it out at tfflifestyle.com/product/proteinbook and enjoy this amazing resource for everything there is to know about protein.

Want to support the show and what TFF is doing? You can share our content with friends and family if you feel like they could get something out of our message. It would also help us out a ton if you left a quick review on the iTunes store, it really helps the podcast grow and reach more listeners (and it only takes 5 min)! If you want to go above and beyond, you can kick us some change by pledging your support on Patreon each month, which is a recurring crowd funding site dedicated to creators like us! It allows us to keep putting out the free content that you’re used to, but helps us to invest more money into improving the quality of the show through better equipment (every penny we make on Patreon goes to bettering our setup to make the content better for you!). You can also visit tfflifestyle.com/support to learn more and make a one-time donation.

If you haven’t already, be sure to check out our YouTube channel, Thought For Food TV, where we just posted a makeup tutorial. I’ll leave it at that for now. We also put up regular vlogs and other cool videos so you can get a behind the scenes look at TFF. It’s a lot of fun!

We really appreciate all the support guys, so don’t forget to follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter so we can engage more with all of our awesome supporters. This is such a fun thing we’re doing, and it’s even cooler that we are having a meaningful impact on people’s lives. So thanks!

Show Notes

Follow TFF:

Facebook.com/TFFlifestyle

Instagram: @tfflifestyle

YouTube Channel: Thought For Food TV

Support TFF: www.patreon.com/thoughtforfood

Twitter: @TFFlifestyle

Follow Jackson on Strava: https://www.strava.com/athletes/54401

Interested in coaching from Jackson and Aaron? Send us an email at tfflifestyle@gmail.com or click services on the website to learn more.

Music by:

soundcloud.com/dcuttermusic

soundcloud.com/peterkuli

The Struggles of the Outgoing Introvert


This week on the show, we’re doing something a little different. On one of the recent YouTube VLOGs, Jackson discussed how he is an outgoing introvert, a type of middle ground between extrovert and introvert. He had just discovered it after Aaron explained it to him, and the two of us decided it would be an interesting episode to discuss what it’s like to be an outgoing introvert. We found an interesting blog post describing the top 8 ways you’ll know if you’re an outgoing introvert and went through each, discussing our own experiences for each. We think a lot of our listeners can relate to what this topic, and it turned into a full on therapy session for the two of us.

We talk about things like:

  • being selectively social rather than anti-social
  • hating traditional systems
  • how our energy levels depend on the environment
  • how we can be the life of the party, once we warm up
  • and more!

It’s a hilarious and fun conversation that we hope you enjoy. If you can relate at all to what we talk about in the episode, definitely send us an email! We’d love to hear your thoughts on the subject, and if you liked the conversation.


We truly appreciate the support you guys give us on all things TFF. From leaving a review on the iTunes store to subscribing to our YouTube channel and leaving comments on the videos, it’s just so cool to be able to interact with you guys. We are also now on Patreon if you want to go the extra mile and get rewarded for it! Patreon is a super cool crowdfunding website that is made for content creators like us. You kick us some loose change each month, we give you exclusive support and attention. Legit! Plus, every penny we get on Patreon goes directly back into TFF in the form of equipment upgrades to make the content better for you. It’s a total win win situation.

If you have any other questions for us for future Q&A episodes, or just want to say hi, don’t hesitate to send us an email. We love hearing from you guys, and thank you again for listening. Go eat some plants, and what’s your thought for food?

-Jackson and Aaron


Show Notes

8 Signs You May Be an Outgoing Introvert


Follow TFF:

Facebook.com/TFFlifestyle

Instagram: @tfflifestyle

Twitter: @TFFlifestyle

Snapchat: TFFlifestyle

YouTube Channel: Thought For Food TV

Jackson on Strava: https://www.strava.com/athletes/54401

Interested in coaching from Jackson and Aaron? Send us an email at tfflifestyle@gmail.com or click services on the website to learn more.

Music by:

soundcloud.com/dcuttermusic

soundcloud.com/peterkuli

Race Report: Bryce Canyon 50 Miler

Written by Aaron Stuber

 

bryce

 

 

Note: This blog was written in June of 2015.

 

I had the pleasure of running the Bryce Canyon 50 miler in beautiful Bryce Canyon National Park this weekend and let me tell you, it was a full experience.  My training the last 6 months has been the hardest on record and with a new coach on board, it was precise, deliberate and much more efficient than in years past.  I showed up in Utah on Saturday ready to push my body and my mind and see what this new training had prepared me for.  This being my first crack at the 50 mile distance, I was also anxious to see if I might finally become acquainted with the limits of my capabilities as a runner; you just never know what you might experience at these distances.

The day started early with a 3:45 am wake up to catch a 4:45 am shuttle out to the park.  I made quick work of my pre-race breakfast of bananas, dates, mangoes, almond butter, beet juice and water in the motel room, got dressed, gathered my gear  and was on the bus ready to go. Accompanying me to the park was my friend and running partner Jai, who had flown out to Boulder from Virginia to test his mettle in the wilderness.  An hour later, our old yellow school bus, which was trailed by another bus jammed beyond capacity with sleepy eyed runners, arrived at the start.  We all shuffled out into the pre-dawn light and formed an instant line, 150 people deep, in front of the portable latrines to empty our bowels.  If there is anything predictable about the minutes before a race, its that people will need to answer the call of nature and we were fortunate that the race directors had managed to tow latrines this far out into the wilderness.

At 6 am sharp, the race began and we were off.  The first mile of the course was on dirt road, giving the pack enough space and time to thin out before entering single track and starting our first climb.  I managed to position myself at the back of what would be the lead group of runners right before we disappeared into dense tree line.  About 15 minutes later, as we moved into an open section of trail, the silence of morning was broken by a harsh buzzing sound, something akin to an enormous swarm of bees just above us.  I panned up quickly to discover a small drone, hovering in the fog and fastened with a blinking GoPro camera, taking film.  The drone operator was standing on a mound of dirt just off trail, glued to his remote screen.  I couldn’t help but ponder the strange juxtaposition of such a futuristic technology being used to record such a primal human activity in such an ancient setting.  With haste, we positioned ourselves for the first climb.

Single track turned suddenly back into forest road as we climbed roughly 900 feet over the next 6 miles to the highest elevation of the race at 9400 ft.  Climbing is a strength and I would customarily use this opportunity to start making strategic passes, but 50 miles is a long way and requires an enormous amount of patience and diligent pacing to avoid blowing up later in the race.  With that in mind I hung back and transitioned to power hiking the steep sections.  I came into Pink Cliffs aid station (mile 6) at the top of the climb, in 12th place overall and 25 minutes ahead of schedule, quickly refilled one of my 20 oz bottles and was off.  The trail abruptly lost altitude and I began descending down to the valley floor.  My running was smooth, easy and on pace so as not to kill the legs on the first downhill.  In hind site, this was one of the most enjoyable sections of the course for me.  Eventually the trail wound its way through a spectacularly beautiful meadow, bathed in shimmering light from the rising suns rays reflecting off morning dew.  The smell of mountain wild flowers was potent and reminded me of so many backpacking trips through the Eagle Cap Wilderness of NE Oregon.  Had I been hiking, I would have stopped for a while to more fully take in the scenery, but I was on a war path, 100% focused on the race.

Straight Canyon aid station (mile 11.5) came quickly.  I was now 45 minutes ahead of schedule and closing in on the 10th place runner.  I refilled water bottles, slammed a Vega energy bar and was out in less than two minutes.  The weather at this point was about as ideal as one could hope for in the mountains.  The thick fog of the early morning had burned off and left a partly cloudy sky with an average temperature in the high 40s and no wind.  I was running in top form, fully immersed in flow and feeling weightless, feeling strong, feeling a deep sense of connection with the wilderness surrounding me.  The next 5 miles had a few rolling climbs, totaling 750 feet as I moved back out of the valley and towards the rim of Bryce Canyon.

I came into Kanab Creek aid station (mile 16.5) over an hour ahead of schedule and having passed the 10th place runner on one of the climbs, was now holding steady in 9th overall and feeling strong.  I rushed over to my drop bag and loaded my vest with more bars and gels.  Working my way through the aid station buffet, I crammed as many bananas, grapes and watermelon down my throat as possible, refilled my water bottles and took off.  The next section of trail was a critical opportunity to increase my pace slightly and put some distance on the runners behind me.  Within a few miles, I caught up to what had now become one of the lead packs and I could see the 4th through 8th place runners. My strategy was to stay put and just keep them within eye sight until the next aid station.  With the race not even half way over, I knew anything could happen between now and the finish so I resolved to slow down a bit and start picking people off by attrition.  This is when I started running with another guy from Boulder who was shirtless, despite the cold air that had rendered my hands useless, and sporting a deep cough which he assured me was just pneumonia and that he felt great for a 50 miler today.  He would run at full speed down the steepest sections of trail, then stop and pull his dick out through the side of his shorts to piss, cough a few more times and continue on at a pace I could not understand.  Surely he would blow up and drop at the next aid station.

Right around mile 19, I started to feel a familiar tension in my left Achillles tendon and it filled me with despair.  This had happened before towards the end of a 50k and caused me to slow significantly.  I ignored it.  By the time I got to Blubber Creek aid station (mile 24.5) my achilles had started to seize up and I knew the next half of the race was going to be a test of pain tolerance.  Still in 9th place and with no intention of stopping, I had to give up my hopes of holding onto a top 10 finish (9 hrs or less) and resolve to make top 20 (10 hours or less) come hell or high water.  The gentleman with the pneumonia, who I had been running with, noticed I was having problems and took that opportunity to skip the aid station and put a substantial distance between us.  I would never see him again.

I pushed on and prepared myself for a long and steep descent over the next 9 miles which I could use to keep good time despite my failing left leg. It was starting to warm up at this point and I was taking in more fluids and calories.  Eat, drink, move.  Eat, drink, move.  I repeated the mantra as a reminder of self care and as a distraction from the pain in my leg.  As the trail turned steeply downhill, I resorted to planting with the heel of each foot instead of the mid foot to avoid engaging the achilles.  This strategy worked well for resting the calf but I knew it would put undue stress on my quads and fatigue them for the harder climbs and descents towards the end of the course.

 

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Proctor aid station (mile 33.5) came slowly and I was now 30 minutes off my original pace and in 12th place overall.  I limped over to my drop bag, grabbed my last gel flask and bars and loaded those quickly into my vest.  This aid station had a good assortment of fruit so I ate as much as I could and was on my way.  This next section I knew would be slow going as fatigue set in and the constant climbing and descending would take more power from my legs, especially with my current form.  I also noticed a very ominous storm cell moving in that had pounded the area the previous day with hale, rain and lightning.  This was going to be an epic finish to my first 50 miler without a doubt.

Eat, drink, move.  Eat, drink, move.  By now, the pain in my achilles had become significant.  Each foot strike felt like someone was slicing into my tendon with a hot knife and it turned my stomach.  The steep climbing was almost impossible as I had to engage the foot slightly to push off. Gradually my pace slowed and I started to feel the cumulative fatigue and stress of the day wearing me down.  I was passed a few more times and felt my hard earned progress slipping away.  Then I heard the first loud crack of thunder and started preparing myself for the storm.  As I reached the top of the canyon, the first few pieces of hale made their way down and bounced off the trail in front of me.  Seconds later the sky opened up with all of its furry and I was assaulted by pea sized cannon balls of ice.  Having only an ultralight, windproof top on and being totally exposed with no where to seek shelter, I took the full brunt of the storm directly.  Each hit felt like a bee sting and I found myself suddenly panicked by the unexpected pain this storm was inflicting.  Eventually the hale abated and was followed by heavy rain, biting wind and lightning.  I was now completely soaked, freezing cold, injured and exposed on a ridge in a lightning storm with nowhere to hide.  Eat, drink, move and get off this ridge right now you son of a bitch.

I started running as fast as I could, adrenaline numbing the pain in my leg.  I knew lightning must have been touching down behind me because I didn’t see the bolts, only their flashes followed in lock step by the ear drum popping crack of their charge.  I came to find out later that a runner a few minutes behind me was knocked unconscious by a bolt that struck the ground right beside him.  Apparently he came to on the ground, got back up and continued running (what else are you going to do?)  Finally the trail began to descend off of the ridge and back into the treeline and by this time the storm had blown over, leaving only beautiful sunshine in its wake.  I started to thaw out and continued my hobbled run into Thunder Mountain aid station (mile 42).  This station had gathered a collection of wide eyed runners who had just survived the same storm and needed to vent about the experience.  I wanted to be done and so wasted no time gallivanting, refilled my water and trudged on.

Eight miles was all that separated me from the finish line and the end of a very long day and so I picked up my pace a bit, ignoring the stabbing pain in my achilles.  I was in 15th place and more than an hour behind my original schedule but I knew If I could just maintain my pace, a 10 hour finish in the top 20 was still possible.  I was not about to let this slip away.  Each mile was a grind and seemed to last for an eternity.  The trail oscillated between straight up and straight down which was destroying my already fatigued quads and worsening the pain in my leg.  I was reminded of a saying in ultrarunning, “relentless forward progress,” which I clung to and kept repeating in my head.  Again, I hobbled my way to the top of another ridge and not a minute later the crack of thunder was above me.  This storm brought hale again, and lucky for me, it was twice the size and twice the velocity.  Now I was screaming obscenities and desperately searching for cover.  I managed to spot a small pine tree off trail and ran over to it.  I hugged its trunk and held on for the ride.  It afforded me just enough cover not to be injured and I was grateful for it.

The hale passed quickly and transitioned into a downpour of ice cold rain.  I was thoroughly done with my 50 mile experience at this point and just wanted to sit in a hot bath to soak my wounds.  Onward I slogged through the muddy trails with inches of heavy, bright red clay accumulating on the soles of my shoes, making travel that much more laborious.  I was passed two more times and lost count of my place but figured I was still under 20.  With less than two minutes remaining before the 10 hour mark, I picked up my pace and grunted on.  Finally, on a ridge line above the trail, I heard people cheering.  “The finish line is at the bottom of the hill!,” they said and I started running hard.  The last stretch of trail, downhill, towards the finish line was a blur as I passed through a row of pine trees into a crowd of muddy, cold and wet runners, smiling from ear to ear.  10 hours flat, 17th place overall.  Not a bad performance for my first 50 miler, considering the injury and the conditions. There is a steep learning curve with events of this distance and I certainly learned a lot, about myself mostly and what I am capable of.  Until next time.

Eat Plants, Get Stronger?

Written by Jackson Long

 

What’s the first thing that pops into your head when you hear the words plant-based, vegan and athlete? You might say: weak, scrawny and deficient. After all, meat is associated with strength, power and muscle. Well, what if I told you that eating nothing but plants, AKA a plant-based diet, can actually make you a stronger, faster, more powerful athlete?

In case you didn’t know, what you eat is quite important to feeling good, preventing chronic disease and as an athlete, it becomes even more essential for proper fueling. Traditionally, the public consensus has been that vegetarian or vegan diets cannot sustain an athlete optimally and that they may cause nutrient deficiencies. But what does the science say and are there any vegan athletes out there thriving?

We’ll start with current plant-based athletes. There’s Scott Jurek, champion ultramarathon runner who broke the speed record of the Appalachian Trail (about 2,200 miles) in 46 days last year. Griff Whalen, wide receiver for the San Diego Chargers, eats nothing but plants and the sole member of Team USA’s powerlifting squad at this year’s Rio Olympics, Kendrick Farris, is a totally plant-based. From endurance athletes to powerlifters, it would appear that athletic greatness is certainly possible on plants, but how does it actually work?

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Unfortunately, the data on plant-based diets and athletic performance is somewhat lacking. In fact, the research on basically any kind of diet and athletic performance is lacking. So let’s look at what we do know. A 2006 review of vegetarian diets and athletic performance found that “appropriately planned vegetarian diets can provide sufficient energy and an appropriate range of carbohydrate, fat and protein intakes to support performance and health”1.

The American College of Sports Medicine, perhaps the best source for all things sports science, determined that “well-planned vegetarian diets seem to effectively support parameters that influence athletic performance, although studies on this population are limited”2. At the macro level, there seems to be some evidence that this may work but let’s take a closer look.

Athletes require a few basic things to thrive and perform at their best: proper training, adequate fueling and expedited recovery. Recovery seems to be the golden ticket to optimal performance because it’s where the true “gains” are made. Oxidative stress, muscle damage and impaired immune function are all negative effects of exercise, especially at high intensities and prolonged duration that must be countered by physiologic adaptations to stress and healthy food.

For nutrition, athletes must simultaneously gain energy from macronutrients like carbohydrates (the body’s preferred fuel source) and fat and also procure enough amino acids to repair tissue. Micronutrients (such as vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and other phytonutrients) are essential for reducing oxidative stress/inflammation and soreness and keeping the immune system functioning at baseline during intense training periods.

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Sufficient caloric intake for plant-based athletes is essential and carbohydrates are the most efficient source of fuel for skeletal muscles and the brain.  Carbohydrates are broken down into glucose which is used for immediate metabolic needs and also stored as glycogen in the muscles and liver. The most plentiful sources of this macronutrient are starches (potatoes, corn, grains, legumes, etc) and fruits.

Traditionally, protein has been thought to be the limiting factor for vegetarian athletes, making it difficult to excel in sports at a high level. Data shows that the protein intake required for proper recovery and muscle synthesis for athletes is between 1.2-2.0 g/kg/day2, which is easily achieved from plant based sources. And no, you don’t need to combine proteins to get all the amino acids3. Plant sources of protein include beans (41g/cup), tofu (20g/cup), and nuts (27g/cup). If caloric needs are met from whole food plant sources, protein needs are met.

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Micronutrients, as discussed earlier, are a critical component of successful athletics on a plant-based diet and may provide an advantage over omnivorous diets since athletes require more antioxidant load to offset the oxidative damage done by intense training. Eating a diet rich in phytonutrients can also reduce the frequency and duration of upper respiratory tract infections and boost immune activity4. There are even special compounds called nitrates, which are found in foods like beets and arugula, that dilate blood vessels and deliver more oxygen to working skeletal muscles, thus increasing performance5. Other key nutrients are iron, calcium and vitamin B12. Iron and calcium are found in leafy greens and legumes, B12 should be supplemented to avoid deficiency.

A few nutrients may be of concern for plant-based athletes, and may warrant supplementation. I already mentioned B12, but also zinc, EPA and DHA omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D are important for athletes of all dietary preferences. They can be tough to get enough of in any diet, so it might be a good idea to supplement in order to ensure you’re covering all the bases.

The body is a machine, and as an athlete you want to make sure that machine is running on all cylinders. That means fueling it with the best possible ingredients. Superior athletic performance requires superior fuel and plant foods can most definitely provide the body with the materials to do amazing things.

 

References:

 

 

  1. Venderley AM, Campbell WW. Vegetarian diets. Sports Medicine. 2006;36(4):293–305. doi:10.2165/00007256-200636040-00002.
  2. Thomas DT, Erdman KA, Burke LM. Position of the academy of nutrition and Dietetics, Dietitians of Canada, and the American college of sports medicine: Nutrition and athletic performance. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. 2016;116(3):501–528. doi:10.1016/j.jand.2015.12.006
  3. Novick, J. The Myth of Complementary Protein. Forks Over Knives. 2013. http://www.forksoverknives.com/the-myth-of-complementary-protein/
  4. Gleeson M, Bishop NC. Modification of immune responses to exercise by carbohydrate, glutamine and anti-oxidant supplements. Immunology and Cell Biology. 2000;78(5):554–561. doi:10.1046/j.1440-1711.2000.00953.x.
  5. Bailey, S, Winyard, P et al. Dietary nitrate supplementation reduces the O2 cost of low-intensity exercise and enhances tolerance to high-intensity exercise in humans. Journal of Applied Physiology Oct 2009, 107 (4) 1144-1155; DOI: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00722.2009

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sid Garza-Hillman on Approaching the Natural Through Integrated Movement and a Small Steps Approach to Health

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Boy oh boy are we excited about this one! We’ve been huge fans of Sid for a long time, from the amazing commentary on his podcast, Approaching the Natural, to his hilariously brilliant YouTube VLOGS, Sid Garza-Hillman is perfectly aligned with TFF. A certified nutritionist, health coach, Programs Director at the Stanford Inn, 50k race director, and ultramarathoner, Sid is a straight up badass. He’s been in the plant-based scene for quite some time now, and is an advocate of the small steps approach, which we talk about in the show.

In this episode, we talk to Sid about things like:

  • his background in acting and music
  • approaching the natural through a small steps approach
  • why integrating exercise throughout the day is more effective than working out and then sitting
  • Sid’s thoughts on effective activism
  • much more!

If you haven’t already, definitely go subscribe to both Sid’s podcast and YouTube channel. They are amazing. Huge thank you to Sid for joining us on TFF, and we’re excited for future collaborations in the future. We will warn you, this was our first ever Skype interview, and was somewhat of a test run as we didn’t know what to expect. For some reason, Aaron sounds like he was calling in via satellite phone from the Gobi Desert, so we apologize for the bad audio quality in sections. Jackson and Sid sound great though.


We just want to say how grateful we are for each and every one of you tuning into the show each week. We absolutely love doing this and it makes it even better to know that we are reaching people all over the world and having an impact on your lives. It means so much when you send us a nice email or leave a 5-star review on iTunes, we read each and every one and it makes our day every time. Keep doing what you’re doing and living the Thought For Food Lifestyle. Jackson has been having a ton of fun on YouTube making a few VLOGS each week, so definitely subscribe to Thought For Food TV for regular videos, it gives a different perspective on TFF than the podcast! And keep sending us your questions on email for future Q&A episodes, we love answering your questions so don’t be shy. We will be in Los Angeles from October 22nd-25th, so if you’re around, give us a shout! We’d love to connect. Until next week,

go eat some plants. what’s your thought for food?

-Jackson and Aaron


Show Notes

 

Sid’s website: http://sidgarzahillman.com/

Podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/approaching-natural-podcast/id705700222?mt=2

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsU_Wof0HYUTehD34CKcIBw


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YouTube Channel: Thought For Food TV

Jackson on Strava: https://www.strava.com/athletes/54401

Interested in coaching from Jackson and Aaron? Send us an email at tfflifestyle@gmail.com or click services on the website to learn more.

Music by:

soundcloud.com/dcuttermusic

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