The Evidence-Based Trio: 3 Nutrients Every Plant Eater Needs

We constantly get questions about what supplements to take if you’re on a plant-based diet, which supplements we take, and why. This is definitely an important and widespread question, and we’ll definitely do a more in depth What’s The Deal style episode on some more supplements and the supplement industry in general, but we wanted to focus on the three primary nutrients of concern for the plant-based population — collectively known as the evidence-based trio —due to their stature and importance in the scientific literature. The science is pretty clear that anyone on a plant-based diet, even if you eat a super healthy one, should be supplementing with these three nutrients due to their physiological importance but also the fact that they are very very difficult to get in sufficient amounts in the plant kingdom. So if you’re curious about what supplements to take on a plant-based diet, these are the Big Three that are pretty much non negotiable. In this episode we go through the data and the science behind them and why they are so important.

Full disclosure: this episode is a collaboration between us and Lightdrop, the new company that Jackson has started working for that produces the product Complement, which is a supplement of these three nutrients. We believe strongly in the science behind the product and use it every day. They are supporting us through the sale of each bottle you buy, and we’re more than happy to spread the word on Complement, which is a vegan product created by vegans which is important in helping the plant-based community thrive. We’re thrilled to announce a very special offer for the listeners of this show: get the evidence-based trio in one, easy to use, and high quality spot with Complement for only $1 per day. Save 10% on the lifetime of your subscription by visiting http://bit.ly/complementtff and use discount code TFF at checkout. Legit.

For all relevant data and resources regarding the information presented in this episode, check out the show notes below to go further down the science rabbit hole to learn more. We just didn’t have time to cover everything! Disclaimer: we’re not medical doctors and the information in this podcast and others is not intended to be a replacement for professional medical treatment or treat or cure any disease. Please consult your healthcare provider before making any significant lifestyle changes.

Thank you so so much to our 111 (as of writing this post) Patrons. We’re nearly a quarter of the way to our 2018 goal, and have been blown away by the support of our Patreon crew. You guys are killing it and playing an integral role in the future of TFF’s mission success and investing in the future of the plant-based movement. Learn more about the exclusive perks (like gaining early access to our latest merchandise) by visiting our Patreon page.

Want to keep up to date with all things Thought For Food? Subscribe to our weekly newsletter where we share interesting nutrition science, favorite podcasts and videos, lifestyle tips, and more. You can sign up at tfflifestyle.com/newsletter. We’re also very active on Instagram @tfflifestyle and if you want to connect with an absolutely awesome crew of likeminded plant based science warriors, join the Thought For Food Club on Facebook to hop in the conversation by going to facebook.com/groups/tffclub.

Okay everyone. Enjoy the show, and take control of your health and ensure your dialed with these nutrients of concern. PEACE!

-Jackson and Aaron

Listen on Google Play Music

 

 

 


Show Notes

B12

  1. http://www.veganhealth.org/articles/vitaminb12
  2. Herbert V. Staging vitamin B-12 (cobalamin) status in vegetarians. Am J Clin Nutr. 1994 May;59(5 Suppl):1213S-1222S.
  3. Herrmann W, Schorr H, Obeid R, Geisel J. Vitamin B-12 status, particularly holotranscobalamin II and methylmalonic acid concentrations, and hyperhomocysteinemia in vegetarians. Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Jul;78(1):131-6.
  4. Messina M, Messina V. The Dietitian’s Guide to Vegetarian Diets. Gaithersburg, MD: Aspen Publishers, Inc., 1996.
  5. Davis JR, Goldenring J, Lubin B. Nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in infants. Am J Dis Child. 1981(Jun);135:566-7.
  6. Lloyd-Wright Z, Allen N, Key TJ, Sanders TB. How prevalent is vitamin B12 deficiency among British vegetarians and vegans? Proceedings of the Nutrition Society. University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK. 2001(Jul):174A.
  7. Hokin BD, Butler T. Cyanocobalamin (vitamin B-12) status in Seventh-day Adventist ministers in Australia. Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Sep;70(3 Suppl):576S-578S.
  8. Crane MG, Sample C, Patchett S, Register UD. “Vitamin B12 studies in total vegetarians (vegans). Journal of Nutritional Medicine.1994;4:419-430.
  9. https://nutritionfacts.org/2011/09/12/dr-gregers-2011-optimum-nutrition-recommendations/

Vitamin D

  1. Vitamin D Deficiency. John H. LeeJames H. O’KeefeDavid BellDonald D. HensrudMichael F.Holick
  2. Outila, T. A., KÄRKKÄINEN, M. U. M., SEPPÄNEN, R. H., & Lamberg-Allardt, C. J. E. (2000). Dietary intake of vitamin D in premenopausal, healthy vegans was insufficient to maintain concentrations of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and intact parathyroid hormone within normal ranges during the winter in Finland. Journal of the American Dietetic Association100(4), 434-441.
  3. Armas, L. A., Hollis, B. W., & Heaney, R. P. (2004). Vitamin D2 is much less effective than vitamin D3 in humans. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism89(11), 5387-5391.
  4. Trang, H. M., Cole, D. E., Rubin, L. A., Pierratos, A., Siu, S., & Vieth, R. (1998). Evidence that vitamin D3 increases serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D more efficiently than does vitamin D2. The American journal of clinical nutrition68(4), 854-858.
  5. Chan, J., Jaceldo-Siegl, K., & Fraser, G. E. (2009). Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D status of vegetarians, partial vegetarians, and nonvegetarians: the Adventist Health Study-2. The American journal of clinical nutrition89(5), 1686S-1692S.
  6. Heaney, R. P., Armas, L. A., Shary, J. R., Bell, N. H., Binkley, N., & Hollis, B. W. (2008). 25-Hydroxylation of vitamin D3: relation to circulating vitamin D3 under various input conditions. The American journal of clinical nutrition87(6), 1738-1742.
  7. https://www.foundmyfitness.com/vitamin-d
  8. http://www.veganhealth.org/articles/bones#vitD

EPA/DHA

  1. J S O’Brien, E L Sampson. Lipid composition of the normal human brain: gray matter, white matter, and myelin. J Lipid Res. 1965 Oct;6(4):537-44.
  2. Z S Tan, W S Harris, A S Beiser, R Au, J J Himali, S Debette, A Pikula, C Decarli, P A Wolf, R S Vasan, S J Robins, S Seshadri. Red blood cell ω-3 fatty acid levels and markers of accelerated brain aging. Neurology. 2012 Feb 28;78(9):658-64.
  3. E Sydenham, A D Dangour, W S Lim. Omega 3 fatty acid for the prevention of cognitive decline and dementia. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012 Jun 13;(6):CD005379.
  4. A V Witte, L Kerti, H M Hermannstädter, J B Fiebach, S J Schreiber, J P Schuchardt, A Hahn, A Flöel. Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids improve brain function and structure in older adults. Cereb Cortex. 2014 Nov;24(11):3059-68.
  5. B Sarter, K S Kelsey, T A Schwartz, W S Harris. Blood docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid in vegans: Associations with age and gender and effects of an algal-derived omega-3 fatty acid supplement. Clin Nutr. 2015 Apr;34(2):212-8.
  6. P Y Lin, C C Chiu, S Y Huang, K P Su. A meta-analytic review of polyunsaturated fatty acid compositions in dementia. J Clin Psychiatry. 2012 Sep;73(9):1245-54.
  7. F A Muskiet, M R Fokkema, A Schaafsma, E R Boersma, M A Crawford. Is docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) essential? Lessons from DHA status regulation, our ancient diet, epidemiology and randomized controlled trials. J Nutr. 2004 Jan;134(1):183-6.
  8. W S Harris, J V Pottala, S A Varvel, J J Borowski, J N Ward, J P McConnell. Erythrocyte omega-3 fatty acids increase and linoleic acid decreases with age: observations from 160,000 patients. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2013 Apr;88(4):257-63.
  9. W Stonehouse, C A Conlon, J Podd, S R Hill, A M Minihane, C Haskell, D Kennedy. DHA supplementation improved both memory and reaction time in healthy young adults: a randomized controlled trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 May;97(5):1134-43.
  10. D Benton, R T Donohoe, D E Clayton, S J Long. Supplementation with DHA and the psychological functioning of young adults. Br J Nutr. 2013 Jan 14;109(1):155-61.
  11. J M Geleijnse, E J Giltay, D Kromhout. Effects of n-3 fatty acids on cognitive decline: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in stable myocardial infarction patients. Alzheimers Dement. 2012 Jul;8(4):278-87.
  12. D H Lee, D R Jacobs Jr. Inconsistent epidemiological findings on fish consumption may be indirect evidence of harmful contaminants in fish. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2010 Mar;64(3):190-2.
  13. K Lane, E Derbyshire, W Li, C Brennan. Bioavailability and potential uses of vegetarian sources of omega-3 fatty acids: a review of the literature. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2014;54(5):572-9.
  14. http://www.veganhealth.org/articles/omega3

Lightdrop:

TFF offer: http://bit.ly/complementtff

Website: http://lightdrop.io

Facebook: http://facebook.com/lightdropnutrition

Instagram: @teamlightdrop

Twitter: @teamlightdrop

Connect with TFF:

Website: tfflifestyle.com
Instagram: instagram.com/tfflifestyle
Facebook: facebook.com/tfflifestyle
Thought For Food Club: http://facebook.com/groups/tffclub
Twitter: twitter.com/tfflifestyle
Patreon: patreon.com/thoughtforfood
YouTube: bit.ly/tfftv
Podcast: bit.ly/TFFitunes

Music by: David Cutter Music – http://www.davidcuttermusic.com

 

Eating Fat For Performance, Vegan Travel, and Food Combining | Q&A 007



Listen on Google Play Music

This week we answer listener questions on our seventh installment of the Q&A podcast. Questions addressed include:

  • which form of oats is healthiest?
  • what’s our take on intermittent fasting?
  • best practices for supplementation and how to trust supplement quality
  • are high fat plant foods unhealthy or do they hinder performance for athletes?
  • traveling abroad as a vegan and running in a foreign place
  • what’s the deal with food combining?
  • how plant-based nutrition affects type 1 diabetes
  • nutritional guidance for a high school plant-based athlete

Thank you to Miriam, Guy, Taylor, Emily, and Evan for the awesome questions! If you want a question featured on the show, send us an email to tfflifestyle@gmail.com

We are incredibly excited to be a part of the advisory board for Balanceda new non-profit organization that is dedicated to fighting for nutritional responsibility within corporations, hospitals, schools, businesses, and beyond and shifting towards an evidence-based framework within this system. Started by Audrey Sanchez in partnership with NutritionFacts.org, Balanced is brand new so go check them out on social media and their website, balanced.orgThey are @getbalancednow on Instagram and @getbalanced_now on Twitter. We are absolutely honored and thrilled to join legends like Dr. Michael Greger and Dr. Michelle McMacken on the advisory board, since we are so passionate about this mission. 

New Go Eat Some Plants shirts are on the way! Stay tuned to our social media for updates and they will be available soon!

Enjoy the show.

-Jackson and Aaron


Want to support the show and what TFF is doing? You can share our content with friends and family if you feel like they could get something out of our message. It would also help us out a ton if you left a quick review on the iTunes store, it really helps the podcast grow and reach more listeners (and it only takes 5 min)! If you want to go above and beyond, you can kick us some change by pledging your support on Patreon each month, which is a recurring crowd funding site dedicated to creators like us! It allows us to keep putting out the free content that you’re used to, but helps us to invest more money into improving the quality of the show through better equipment (every penny we make on Patreon goes to bettering our setup to make the content better for you!). You can also visit tfflifestyle.com/support to learn more and make a one-time donation. We also have a few shirts over on the shop page, so get ’em while you can! More are coming soon.

If you haven’t already, be sure to subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or wherever you listen to podcasts to get the new episode right as it comes out. Also, subscribe our YouTube channel, Thought For Food TV

We really appreciate all the support guys, so don’t forget to follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter so we can engage more with all of our awesome supporters. This is such a fun thing we’re doing, and it’s even cooler that we are having a meaningful impact on people’s lives. So thanks! If you have any questions for future Q&A episodes, drop us an email at tfflifestyle@gmail.com or by visiting the contact us page on the website.

Show Notes

Resources mentioned:

Found My Fitness Podcast

Ray Cronise on Rich Roll Podcast

Follow TFF:

Facebook.com/TFFlifestyle

Instagram: @tfflifestyle

YouTube Channel: Thought For Food TV

Support TFF: www.patreon.com/thoughtforfood

Twitter: @TFFlifestyle

Follow Jackson on Strava: https://www.strava.com/athletes/54401

Music by:

soundcloud.com/dcuttermusic

soundcloud.com/peterkuli

 

What’s the Deal With Carbs?

screen-shot-2017-01-10-at-7-46-40-am

The king of macronutrients. The most controversial word in all of nutrition. Builder of cities, destroyer of empires. Carbohydrates. In the fourth installment of our What’s the Deal series, we go hard and deep on all things carbs. With so much information and misinformation out there, we did what we do best and jumped on the science, the cold hard evidence, first defining this nutrient and its function and then address some of the major claims about carbohydrates such as:

  • carbohydrates make you fat
  • carbs cause inflammation
  • carbs from fruit are the same as table sugar
  • high-carb diets cause diabetes and cancer
  • and more!

We also discuss the role of carbohydrates for athletes, and then a more philosophical look at applying these concepts through a macro lens and why we should stop talking about carbs and protein and diet so extensively. Grab a notebook, take a glucose break, kick back and relax, and enjoy the show!

Go eat some plants!

-Jackson and Aaron


Thank you thank you thank you to everyone who has subscribed to the show on iTunes or wherever you consume podcasts, left a review on iTunes, shared the show with your friends and family, or given a nice comment on social media. This is such an easy and free way to support what we’re doing, yet is profound! We read each and every comment and review, so keep ’em coming!

If you want to go above and beyond, you can kick us some change by pledging your support on Patreon each month, which is a recurring crowd funding site dedicated to creators like us! It allows us to keep putting out the free content that you’re used to, but helps us to invest more money into improving the quality of the show through better equipment (every penny we make on Patreon goes to bettering our setup to make the content better for you!). You can also visit tfflifestyle.com/support to learn more and make a one-time donation.

Carbs?! What about PROTEIN?! Our new book, Dude, Where Do You Get Your Protein? is available now! Check it out at tfflifestyle.com/product/proteinbook and enjoy this amazing resource for everything there is to know about protein.

If you haven’t already, be sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel, Thought For Food TV, where we put up regular vlogs and other cool videos so you can get a behind the scenes look at TFF. It’s a lot of fun!

So much love for the support everyone, we seriously can’t thank you enough. We are coming up on a year doing this thing and have loved every minute of it, thanks to you. Keep spreading the inspiring message of healthy living, let’s create a paradigm shift together. Have an amazing rest of your week and thanks SO much for listening.


Show Notes

References:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15983191

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23509418

http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/82/2/421.full

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(12)61766-8/abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23933265

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20564476

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21621801

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24065788

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15143200

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18454136

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14693970

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17346204

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1394223/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC507380/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15523486

http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/84/5/1171.short

http://jn.nutrition.org/content/131/11/3109S.short

Follow TFF:

Facebook.com/TFFlifestyle

Instagram: @tfflifestyle

YouTube Channel: Thought For Food TV

Support TFF: www.patreon.com/thoughtforfood

Twitter: @TFFlifestyle

Follow Jackson on Strava: https://www.strava.com/athletes/54401

Interested in coaching from Jackson and Aaron? Send us an email at tfflifestyle@gmail.com or click services on the website to learn more.

Music by:

soundcloud.com/dcuttermusic

soundcloud.com/peterkuli

Matt Ruscigno on Nutrition Science, Athletic Performance, and Keeping Vegans Honest

screen-shot-2016-11-09-at-7-16-36-pm


We’ve talked about why a vegan diet isn’t a panacea for all that ails you, and that just because you go full level 9 vegan doesn’t mean you will become the world’s strongest athlete and you’ll never get sick again. That’s why we were excited to bring Matt Ruscigno on the show. Matt is a registered dietician and holds a Masters of Public Health from Loma Linda University. He’s also been an ethical vegan for 20 years. As a result, he’s both well versed in the science of nutrition, as well as the ethical concerns of diet. Matt keeps it real when it comes to the benefits of a plant-based lifestyle. Matt is also the Past-Chair of the Vegetarian Group of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and has completed many ultra-endurance events, including some 24 hour mountain bike races and ultramarathons. We really resonate with Matt’s approach to diet and nutrition, while still maintaining an awareness of the ethical and environmental concerns around eating animals. We talk to Matt about a lot of topics, including:

  • Nutrition conference culture and the perceptions surrounding vegan diets
  • Is a plant-based diet optimal for athletes?
  • Common claims vegans make and how to address them
  • His thoughts on activism and ways to promote plant-based lifestyles
  • How does exercise and stress management fit into health as a whole?
  • What’s coming in the pipeline for Matt
  • And more!

It was awesome to hang out with Matt for the day, going to the Hollywood Farmer’s Market by his house, and later checking out the Circle V event. Matt is a hugely credible source of knowledge and expertise when it comes to plant-based nutrition, so be sure to check out his website and vegan athlete series, Strongest Hearts.


Matt made an appearance on the TFF VLOG which you can watch here:

Thank you to everyone that has listened to the podcast and left a review on iTunes. It helps us out tremendously and makes our day to read all the wonderful reviews! Definitely be sure to check out our other videos on Thought For Food TV and hit subscribe! AND we’re excited to announce that we are officially on Patreon! Patreon is a really cool crowdfunding website that is recurring, a way for supporting creators like us. We get to offer really cool and exclusive rewards for your support so definitely go check out our page and let us know what you think. Our podcast and videos are and always will be free, so Patreon is for going the extra mile for support. Every penny of what we make on Patreon goes directly back into TFF in the form of equipment upgrades like better podcast microphones, cameras, and perhaps even a drone. It only makes the content better for you!

If you have questions that you’d like for us to answer on a future Q&A podcast, send them to tfflifestyle@gmail.com. Thank you so much for listening, go eat some plants, and what’s your thought for food?

-Jackson and Aaron


Show Notes

Follow Matt:

https://truelovehealth.com/

Strongest Hearts: http://www.strongesthearts.org/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/MattRuscigno

Instagram: @mattruscigno

http://www.bicycling.com/food/nutrition/how-make-tofu-doesnt-suck-seriously

http://www.bikeradar.com/gear/article/can-a-vegan-diet-work-for-cyclists-42982/


Follow TFF:

Facebook.com/TFFlifestyle

Instagram: @tfflifestyle

Twitter: @TFFlifestyle

Snapchat: TFFlifestyle

YouTube Channel: Thought For Food TV

Jackson on Strava: https://www.strava.com/athletes/54401

Interested in coaching from Jackson and Aaron? Send us an email at tfflifestyle@gmail.com or click services on the website to learn more.

Music by:

soundcloud.com/dcuttermusic

soundcloud.com/peterkuli

Photo credit: Bicycling Magazine

Eat Plants, Get Stronger?

Written by Jackson Long

 

What’s the first thing that pops into your head when you hear the words plant-based, vegan and athlete? You might say: weak, scrawny and deficient. After all, meat is associated with strength, power and muscle. Well, what if I told you that eating nothing but plants, AKA a plant-based diet, can actually make you a stronger, faster, more powerful athlete?

In case you didn’t know, what you eat is quite important to feeling good, preventing chronic disease and as an athlete, it becomes even more essential for proper fueling. Traditionally, the public consensus has been that vegetarian or vegan diets cannot sustain an athlete optimally and that they may cause nutrient deficiencies. But what does the science say and are there any vegan athletes out there thriving?

We’ll start with current plant-based athletes. There’s Scott Jurek, champion ultramarathon runner who broke the speed record of the Appalachian Trail (about 2,200 miles) in 46 days last year. Griff Whalen, wide receiver for the San Diego Chargers, eats nothing but plants and the sole member of Team USA’s powerlifting squad at this year’s Rio Olympics, Kendrick Farris, is a totally plant-based. From endurance athletes to powerlifters, it would appear that athletic greatness is certainly possible on plants, but how does it actually work?

picture1

 

Unfortunately, the data on plant-based diets and athletic performance is somewhat lacking. In fact, the research on basically any kind of diet and athletic performance is lacking. So let’s look at what we do know. A 2006 review of vegetarian diets and athletic performance found that “appropriately planned vegetarian diets can provide sufficient energy and an appropriate range of carbohydrate, fat and protein intakes to support performance and health”1.

The American College of Sports Medicine, perhaps the best source for all things sports science, determined that “well-planned vegetarian diets seem to effectively support parameters that influence athletic performance, although studies on this population are limited”2. At the macro level, there seems to be some evidence that this may work but let’s take a closer look.

Athletes require a few basic things to thrive and perform at their best: proper training, adequate fueling and expedited recovery. Recovery seems to be the golden ticket to optimal performance because it’s where the true “gains” are made. Oxidative stress, muscle damage and impaired immune function are all negative effects of exercise, especially at high intensities and prolonged duration that must be countered by physiologic adaptations to stress and healthy food.

For nutrition, athletes must simultaneously gain energy from macronutrients like carbohydrates (the body’s preferred fuel source) and fat and also procure enough amino acids to repair tissue. Micronutrients (such as vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and other phytonutrients) are essential for reducing oxidative stress/inflammation and soreness and keeping the immune system functioning at baseline during intense training periods.

picture1

 

Sufficient caloric intake for plant-based athletes is essential and carbohydrates are the most efficient source of fuel for skeletal muscles and the brain.  Carbohydrates are broken down into glucose which is used for immediate metabolic needs and also stored as glycogen in the muscles and liver. The most plentiful sources of this macronutrient are starches (potatoes, corn, grains, legumes, etc) and fruits.

Traditionally, protein has been thought to be the limiting factor for vegetarian athletes, making it difficult to excel in sports at a high level. Data shows that the protein intake required for proper recovery and muscle synthesis for athletes is between 1.2-2.0 g/kg/day2, which is easily achieved from plant based sources. And no, you don’t need to combine proteins to get all the amino acids3. Plant sources of protein include beans (41g/cup), tofu (20g/cup), and nuts (27g/cup). If caloric needs are met from whole food plant sources, protein needs are met.

picture1

 

Micronutrients, as discussed earlier, are a critical component of successful athletics on a plant-based diet and may provide an advantage over omnivorous diets since athletes require more antioxidant load to offset the oxidative damage done by intense training. Eating a diet rich in phytonutrients can also reduce the frequency and duration of upper respiratory tract infections and boost immune activity4. There are even special compounds called nitrates, which are found in foods like beets and arugula, that dilate blood vessels and deliver more oxygen to working skeletal muscles, thus increasing performance5. Other key nutrients are iron, calcium and vitamin B12. Iron and calcium are found in leafy greens and legumes, B12 should be supplemented to avoid deficiency.

A few nutrients may be of concern for plant-based athletes, and may warrant supplementation. I already mentioned B12, but also zinc, EPA and DHA omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D are important for athletes of all dietary preferences. They can be tough to get enough of in any diet, so it might be a good idea to supplement in order to ensure you’re covering all the bases.

The body is a machine, and as an athlete you want to make sure that machine is running on all cylinders. That means fueling it with the best possible ingredients. Superior athletic performance requires superior fuel and plant foods can most definitely provide the body with the materials to do amazing things.

 

References:

 

 

  1. Venderley AM, Campbell WW. Vegetarian diets. Sports Medicine. 2006;36(4):293–305. doi:10.2165/00007256-200636040-00002.
  2. Thomas DT, Erdman KA, Burke LM. Position of the academy of nutrition and Dietetics, Dietitians of Canada, and the American college of sports medicine: Nutrition and athletic performance. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. 2016;116(3):501–528. doi:10.1016/j.jand.2015.12.006
  3. Novick, J. The Myth of Complementary Protein. Forks Over Knives. 2013. http://www.forksoverknives.com/the-myth-of-complementary-protein/
  4. Gleeson M, Bishop NC. Modification of immune responses to exercise by carbohydrate, glutamine and anti-oxidant supplements. Immunology and Cell Biology. 2000;78(5):554–561. doi:10.1046/j.1440-1711.2000.00953.x.
  5. Bailey, S, Winyard, P et al. Dietary nitrate supplementation reduces the O2 cost of low-intensity exercise and enhances tolerance to high-intensity exercise in humans. Journal of Applied Physiology Oct 2009, 107 (4) 1144-1155; DOI: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00722.2009

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to Start Cycling, Plant-Based Kids, and Update on Exercise Addiction | Q&A 004

screen-shot-2016-10-12-at-8-33-45-pm

Here we are with another Q&A episode! We absolutely love answering your guys’ questions, so keep ’em coming. Thank you to everyone who submitted questions via email and social media. On today’s podcast, we answer questions ranging from how to get started in cycling, to vegan parenting tips, to where we’re at with addressing our exercise addiction. Hope you enjoy the show, and don’t forget to subscribe on iTunes or Google Play to get the latest episode first thing Thursday mornings.


Thanks to everyone for the continued support of TFF. We are more motivated than ever and that’s thanks to you guys. It means so so much to us to see your reviews on iTunes, comments on social media, and outpouring support through emails and all of our content. Let us know what YOU want to see from us here, whether it’s podcast ideas, video ideas, or ways we can improve your experience. We are also fully open for business with nutrition consulting, so if you or someone you know could benefit from individualized consulting and help from either Aaron or Jackson (or both!), shoot us an email or check out the store for more information. Have you subscribed to our YouTube channel yet? We’re putting up pretty regular videos and would love to hear your thoughts and feedback over there so go watch some videos! Here’s our latest to get you started 😉

 

We love you guys, thanks for listening! Go eat some plants, and what’s your thought for food?

-Jackson and Aaron


Show Notes

Follow TFF:

Facebook.com/TFFlifestyle

Instagram: @tfflifestyle

Twitter: @TFFlifestyle

Snapchat: TFFlifestyle

YouTube Channel: Thought For Food TV

Jackson on Strava: https://www.strava.com/athletes/54401

Interested in coaching from Jackson and Aaron? Send us an email at tfflifestyle@gmail.com or click services on the website to learn more.

Music by:

soundcloud.com/dcuttermusic

soundcloud.com/peterkuli

Saturated Fat: What You Need To Know

Written by Jackson Long and Aaron Stuber

screen-shot-2016-10-10-at-7-06-10-pm

Every time you hop on the internet, it seems there is conflicting nutrition advice coming from every direction. Bacon is good for you one day, then it causes cancer the next. One of the best examples in recent years is saturated fat. Time Magazine put butter on their cover recently, insisting that everything we claim to know about saturated fat is wrong.  But what does the science say? What’s the deal with saturated fat?

First off, what is saturated fat? It’s simply a chain of monoglycerides and fatty acids that are “saturated” with hydrogen atoms.  This makes saturated fats solid at room temperature (think bacon grease in a can after you let it cool down).  Most of the saturated fat in the western diet comes from animal products like butter, cheese, milk and meats.

We’ve known for over 50 years that as dietary saturated fat intake rises, so does your cholesterol, especially the bad kind.  In fact, this relationship is so consistent and reproducible that you can accurately predict the total rise in serum cholesterol based on the amount of saturated fat someone consumes using the Hegsted Equation. These results were found through hundreds of metabolic ward studies, where people are locked in a room for weeks with researchers who have total control over their nutritional intake.  That’s as accurate as nutrition studies get.

We also know that high total serum cholesterol is the primary risk factor for cardiovascular disease, our number one killer. Randomized controlled clinical trials, the gold standard of study design, have shown over and over that a reduction in saturated fat intake not only drastically lowers serum cholesterol but that it also reduces the risk of cardiac events like heart attacks. The most prestigious, governing scientific and public health bodies in the world are unanimously in favor of reducing or eliminating dietary saturated fat intake because of its clear role in the development of atherosclerotic disease.  So if there’s such a consensus in the scientific community, why are we still having this debate?

The primary reason is that the meat and dairy industries (and the Atkins Foundation) have done a masterful job of paying scientists (like Ronald M Krauss) to conduct meta analyses of cross-sectional studies which do not have the “power,” in statistical terms, to demonstrate statistically significant correlations between saturated fat intake and heart disease. This happens because cross-sectional studies, as opposed to controlled feeding experiments, are only designed to show a change in cholesterol based on dietary interventions.  Knowing the change in someones cholesterol after altering their diet, without knowing their total cholesterol level, makes it impossible to infer a relationship between that change and disease risk.  There are very clear relationships between total cholesterol levels and the manifestation of coronary artery disease, so much so that we can say with scientific accuracy that people with a total cholesterol under 150 (such as you might find in Sub-Saharan Africa) will be virtually disease free.  We can also predictably reverse coronary disease by getting saturated fat low enough.

There is nothing academically dishonest about doing cross-sectional studies of this kind; they show other relationships that are important.  The problem lies in the funding and publication of reviews that selectively and exclusively use this limited data.  The studies are set up to fail.  This is the sole intention of industry: confuse the public and remove their incentive to change by manufacturing doubt.  That was, after all, the MO of the tobacco industry in decades past.

Articles like the one in TIME and other major media outlets continue to stoke the fire of controversy and create mass appeal for leaders in the high fat/low carb world, who cash in on their contrarian point of view to the detriment of public health.  We might laugh if the stakes weren’t so high. Isn’t it time we looked critically at the evidence and stopped killing ourselves with food?  The beautiful thing about science is that it’s true, whether you believe it or not.

Disease Fighting Fall Soup Recipe

Written by Aaron Stuber

 

Several years ago, my wife and I purchased a cookbook by Isa Chandra Moskowitz called, Vegan with a Vengeance that has since become so dilapidated and covered in food bits as to render it nearly unreadable.  As cookbooks go, this is a good sign.

We both really like hearty food, the kind that warms your bones, especially as the weather grows cold and keeps you inside more hours of the day.  If you share our delight for comfort food and don’t mind preparing your own, give this recipe a try; you’ll be glad you did.

On page 68 of this phenomenal book, you will find a recipe for “Chili sin Carne al Mole.”

To make this meal you will need the following ingredients:

1/3 cup olive oil
1 large onion
1 small jalapeno, minced
1 small red bell pepper, chopped
3 cloves garlic, smashed
1 pound seitan, coarsley chopped into 1/4-inch cubes
2 tablespoons chile powder
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1 (28oz) can whole, peeled tomatoes in sauce
3 tablespoons cocoa powder
3 tablespoons blackstrap molasses
2 (14oz) cans pinto or black beans, drained and well rinsed
2 1/2 cups vegetable broth (we use low sodium)

Preheat a large (at least 6 quart) pot over medium-high heat; pour in and heat the olive oil.  Add the onions and peppers and saute for 2 minutes, then add the garlic and seitan.  Cook this for 8 minutes, until the onions are soft.  Add the chile powder, cinnamon, and cumin, stirring occasionally for another minute.

Now add the tomatoes, then add the beans and vegetable broth.  Cover and bring to a gentle boil, then lower heat and simmer for about 30 minutes.  You should allow this to sit at least 20 minutes before serving.

You might notice that we added one additional ingredient, sweet potatoes.  This really thickens things up and gives the soup a seriously hearty flavor and consistency; and frankly, we just love sweet potatoes so why not?  We also doubled the recipe so that we could eat this all week. You can also eat half and freeze half for enjoying at a later date if you prefer.

Before I wrap this up, I want to explain why I call this a “disease fighting” soup recipe.  Most people, when they look at this meal in its finished state, see a bowl full of plants, something composed of just a few raw elements that will provide a source of calories.

I see a mobile pharmacy teaming with hundreds of unique phytochemicals whose sole purpose is to protect our bodies from the ravages of oxidative stress, in turn preventing and eating treating chronic disease.  As it turns out, most of the ingredients in this soup have been demonstrated to do just that, so here is a preview.

The onions in this pot contain compounds such as quercitin, sulfur, aromatase inhibitors and flavonoids, all of which have strong anticancer, antioxidant, antimicrobial, antiviral and immune system modulating activity.  The same can be said for the garlic and tomatoes with the notable addition of lycopene, the tomatoes secret carotenoid weapon.

All of the spices have powerful anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties which might be one reason why populations in the east enjoy much lower rates of this disease.

The cocoa powder comes from the cacao bean which contains high amounts of magnesium and a few special compounds: anandamide and theobromine, neurotransmitters that cause a sensation of euphoria.  Who knew you could get high eating soup?

To top that all off, the beans are a concentrated source of resistant starch, a type of insoluble fiber that feeds gut microbes and gets them to produce butyrate, a compound highly protective against colon cancer. Beans are also loaded with protein, isoflavones and antioxidants.

So next time you make a chili like this, learn to see it as so much more than just a source of calories.  See it as medicine, because that’s exactly what it is.

Kayle Martin on Breast Cancer Survival Through Plants

screen-shot-2016-09-28-at-2-33-46-pm

This week on the podcast, we’re excited to bring you an interview with Kayle Martin. Kayle is the owner and founder of Cowgirls and Collard Greens, a business designed to empower women battling breast cancer with knowledge about plant-based nutrition. Kayle was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 30 and decided to adopt a completely raw-vegan diet combined with conventional cancer treatment, which led to curing her disease and catalyzing her to spread the message of plant-based living to prevent and reverse disease. She loves animals, and has a particular affinity to horses, and became vegetarian after her beloved cow, cupcake, ended up on her dinner plate. Kayle also lives a mostly digital-nomad lifestyle, following her passions. 

In the episode, which was a solo interview from Aaron, is focused on Kayle’s story surrounding breast cancer and veganism. The conversation also includes a discussion of her current lifestyle based on travel and growing her business. Kayle is incredibly inspiring and is a fantastic resource for helping to empower women around taking control of their health through plants. We hope this episode helps bring to your awareness the power of plants.


Thank you to everyone who has supported TFF through social media, leaving a review on iTunes, or sending us emails. We’ve been incredibly excited about connecting with you guys, and it means a lot to us that what we’re putting out is at least entertaining, if not helpful and inspiring to people all over the world. If you have a question that you would like answered on the podcast, send us an email to tfflifestyle@gmail.com, we’re gearing up for another Q&A podcast. If you haven’t already and want to support us for free, please consider leaving a review on the iTunes store, which helps us grow and reach more listeners. We’re also producing a ton of new content from Jackson’s YouTube VLOGS to weekly blog articles on the website. Definitely go check those out to see a different side of TFF. Have an awesome day, enjoy the episode, and go eat some plants.

What’s your thought for food?

 

Show Notes


Kayle’s site: Cowgirls and Collard Greens

Kayle on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CowgirlsCollardGreens

Instagram: @collardcowgirl


Follow TFF:

Facebook.com/TFFlifestyle

Instagram: @tfflifestyle

Twitter: @TFFlifestyle

Snapchat: TFFlifestyle

YouTube Channel: Thought For Food TV

Jackson on Strava: https://www.strava.com/athletes/54401

Interested in coaching from Jackson and Aaron? Send us an email at tfflifestyle@gmail.com to learn more.

Music by:

soundcloud.com/dcuttermusic

soundcloud.com/peterkuli